Monday, 13 March 2017

Germany: Sites of the Reformation

Today I got a cover from Germany.

Stamp:
Bavarian Forest (issued 02-01-2016)


Inside were five German postcards showing various sights of Wittenberg.

The first one shows the Melanchthonhaus. The Melanchthonhaus was the residence of the reformer Philipp Melanchthon. It is said to be one of the most beautiful bourgeois houses in Wittenberg and since 1954 it houses a museum about the reformer. As one of the Luther Memorials in Wittenberg is the Melanchthonhaus since 1996 on the UNESCO World Heritage List.


The second one shows the Town and Parish Church of St Mary's. The Town and Parish Church of St Mary's is considered to be the mother-church of the Protestant Reformation. Martin Luther and Johannes Bugenhagen preached there and the first mass in German was celebrated in the church. As one of the Luther Memorials in Wittenberg is the church since 1996 on the UNESCO World Heritage List.


The third one shows the Castle Church. The Castle Church was built between 1490 and 1511 at the behest of Frederick III, Elector of Saxony, in the Late Gothic style. It forms a part of the Wittenberg Castle and is the site where Martin Luther posted his Ninety-five Theses in 1517, which contributed to the church's nickname "Reformation Church". As one of the Luther Memorials in Wittenberg is the Castle Church since 1996 on the UNESCO World Heritage List.


Another one shows the Theses Doors at the the Castle Church. The Theses Doors are massive commemorative bronze doors, which were mounted onto the jambs where the original wooden ones had been located before they were destroyed. The Theses Doors were inaugurated in 1858. Martin Luther's Ninety-five Theses are inscribed in their original Latin form on the doors.


The last one shows the Cranach-Hof at Markt 4. The Cranach-Hof at Markt 4 was bought by Lucas Cranach the Elder in 1512. There he run his famous painter's workshop and print shop. It is also considered to be the birth house of Lucas Cranach the Younger. It seeks for the inclusion on the UNESCO World Heritage List.


Thank You very much Vanessa!

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