Tuesday, 25 April 2017

Germany: Goslar and the Mines of Rammelsberg

Yesterday I got three postcards from Germany.

Two of them are from Goslar. One of them shows a street with timber-framed houses. Goslar is a town in the German State of Lower Saxony. Between the 10th and the 12th century it was one of the seats of the Holy Roman Empire and was also an important member of the Hanseatic League. Its historic centre is perfectly preserved. Since 1992 are the Historic Town of Goslar and the Mines of Rammelsberg on the UNESCO World Heritage List, in 2010 the Upper Harz Water Management System was added.
I bought the cards when I recently visited Goslar.


With a matching stamp:
25 years of Goslar on the UNESCO World Heritage List (issued 13-04-2017)
with a special postmark about the issuance of the new stamp


The other one shows the Mines of Rammelsberg. The mining at the Rammelsberg was first mentioned in 968 and was continued until 1988 when it was ended because of depletion of the deposit. Mined were mineral ores for the production of silver, lead, copper, zinc and others metals. After the shut-down of the mines a unique museum was created. Today are the Mines of Rammelsberg a National Geotope and an Anchor Point of the European Route of Industrial Heritage.


With a matching stamp:
25 years of Goslar on the UNESCO World Heritage List (issued 13-04-2017)
with a special postmark showing a water wheel at the Rammelsberg


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